Click to return to homepage
                         
 

Was your package returned with this label? Criminal use various come-ons to trick you into what Postal Inspectors call

WHICH OF THESE APPLIES TO YOU?


DID YOU ACCEPT A JOB TO RESHIP MERCHANDISE? OR
DID YOU ACCEPT A JOB TO RESHIP POSTAL MONEY ORDERS?

Work-at-Home Scams
Criminals post job announcements on Internet career sites offering work-at-home positions—sometimes advertised as “merchandising manager” or “package processing assistant.” Duties include receiving packages and mailing them to a foreign address on behalf of a client, using postage-paid mailing labels provided via email.

The real story? It’s a scam!

If you accept the job, you’ll receive packages containing one of two things:

  • Merchandise bought with stolen credit cards—the scammer needs your help to smuggle the goods out of the country.
  • Counterfeit postal money orders—the scammer wants your help to distribute them to other scammers.

And when you receive payment—watch out! The check or postal money order you receive are counterfeits!

Sweetheart Scams
Fraudulent reshippers also lurk on dating websites. They send a few emails to get to know you and may even send photos or flowers. Once they have your attention, they ask you to help their business or family by shipping packages to Europe or Africa. They may claim to be with a charity or mission and need help in delivering “donated” items to Africa or another part of the world.

Another variation is the “lonely hearts” scam. Men, for example, will receive photos of an attractive woman—perhaps calling herself a nurse—who is looking for a husband. If you respond, the nurse claims to be in love with you and asks for money to pay for an airline ticket. If you send the money, the nurse will come up with another reason to ask for yet more money.

The real story? Both the nurse and the photo are fake — and could be the picture of your worst nightmare.

Mystery Shopper Scams
In another twist on the reshipping scam, people receive emails offering yet another work-at-home offer—to be a paid mystery shopper.

If you sign up for the job, you’re paid with a postal money order or check, told to keep your earned portion, and wire the remaining amount elsewhere. Postal Inspectors warn: Make sure the money order or check is genuine before you deposit it. If your bank identifies a money order or check as counterfeit, you may be liable for the full face amount of the counterfeit you deposited in the bank.

IMPORTANT! To verify if a postal money order is authentic, call the Money Order Verification System at 1-866-459-7822.


WERE YOU PAID WITH A COUNTERFEIT POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR CHECK?

Should you wire money to a stranger?
U.S. Postal Inspectors say: Absolutely not! The offer may sound like a nice deal, but—as usual—it’s just too good to be true.

Criminals may offer to pay you for a work-at-home job with a postal money order or check, tell you to keep your earned portion, and request you wire the remaining amount elsewhere.

Postal Inspectors warn: Make sure the money order or check is genuine before you deposit it. If your bank identifies a money order or check as counterfeit, you may be liable for the full face amount of the counterfeit you deposited in the bank.

IMPORTANT! To verify if a postal money order is authentic, call the Money Order Verification System at 1-866-459-7822.


IS YOUR NAME ON THE RETURN ADDRESS BUT YOU DIDN'T SEND THIS PACKAGE?

If you received a package with a Return to Sender by Postal Inspectors label on it, and you didn’t mail the package, you may be the victim of an illegal credit card scheme. Postal Inspectors suggest you check your account with your credit card issuer or bank.

REPORT MAIL FRAUD!
If you believe you’re a victim of one of these scams, file a complaint with Postal Inspectors online or call Postal Inspectors at 1-877-876-2455 (option 4, Mail Fraud).

 

| Inspection Service Home |