U.S. Postal Inspection Service Seal

 

 

UNITED STATES POSTAL INSPECTION SERVICE
NEWS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Bernadette Lundbohm
Title: Postal Inspector

Phone: (617) 556-4489
Email: BMLUNDBOHM@USPIS.GOV

JANUARY 22, 2014

MAN ARRESTED ON FEDERAL CHARGES IN
USPS SHOOTING; SECOND SUSPECT STILL AT LARGE

Boston - A Dorchester man was arrested this morning and another remains a fugitive in connection with the attempted robbery, assault, and kidnapping of a U.S. Postal Service letter carrier on Dec. 20, 2013. A federal criminal complaint was filed in U.S. District Court in Boston yesterday and unsealed today.

Maurice Williams Miner-Gittens, 23, and Keyon Taylor, 21, were charged with conspiracy to rob, attempted robbery, and kidnapping of a federal employee.

The U.S. Postal Inspection Service is seeking the public's assistance in locating Keyon Taylor. Anyone with information regarding Taylor's whereabouts should contact U.S. Postal Inspectors at 877-876-2455 (press 2). Taylor may be armed and should be considered dangerous. No one should attempt to apprehend him. Miner-Gittens has been located and arrested.

The letter carrier was in his postal vehicle when Taylor allegedly jumped into the truck and put a pistol to the carrier's head. A scuffle ensued, and the carrier was shot in the wrist, beaten with the pistol, and kicked, then told to take off his postal uniform and lie face down in the truck.

According to the affidavit, Taylor took the carrier's keys and began to drive the truck away when the letter carrier, who was bleeding extensively and feared for his life, jumped out of the truck and ran away. Taylor drove the truck a short distance before abandoning it and fleeing on foot. He left footprints in the snow and blood on a chain-link fence. The letter carrier's uniform, cell phone, and personal keys were found nearby. Gittens rented and drove a U-Haul van used in the attempted robbery; it had the letter carrier's blood on the outside.

The charges came after an extensive investigation by the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and Boston Police Department. The Boston Police Department's crime laboratory provided exceptional assistance in analyzing forensic evidence within an exceedingly short timeframe.

The defendants each face a maximum sentence of life in prison on the kidnapping charges, five years for conspiracy, and 25 years for the robbery of federal property.

United States Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz, Inspector in Charge of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service Kevin Niland, and Boston Police Commissioner William Evans made the announcement today. The case is being prosecuted by Thomas E. Kanwit of Ortiz's Major Crimes Unit.

The details contained in the complaint are allegations. The defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

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About the U.S. Postal Inspection Service:  The U.S. Postal Inspection Service is one of the oldest federal law enforcement agencies in the country. For more than 200 years, Postal Inspectors have protected the U.S. Postal Service, secured the nation’s mail system and ensured public trust in the mail. postalinspectors.uspis.gov